Monthly Archives: May 2018

Protect Yourself From Scammers

Since taking office in 2007, Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli has made fighting fraud one of his top priorities, helping ensure the integrity of the New York State Common Retirement Fund. But have you been as diligent protecting your own money, including your retirement savings?

Most of us are aware of common scams, emails from princes using poor grammar or phone calls about phony sweepstakes prizes. And we’re confident that we would never fall for these schemes. Still, con artists steal billions of dollars every year from sensible, intelligent people. And you’re most likely to encounter a con artist on the phone.

Scammers trying to call you on the phone?

Exploiting your emotions

Con artists work best when their victims are in a heightened emotional state – excited about that prize money or terrified because they owe a large debt. And that emotional state makes it hard to spot the red flags. But if a caller is trying to scare you or manipulate your emotions, that should be a red flag in itself.

Red flags and common ploys

There are other red flags to watch for. Does the caller use high-pressure sales tactics or threatening language? Do they ask for payment in advance for a product or service or require an unorthodox payment method, such as wire-transfer, pre-paid debit card or gift card? Do they insist that you act now?

One common ploy is a call warning that you’ll be locked up if you don’t pay your back taxes right now. But the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) always notifies delinquent taxpayers by mail before they call. The real IRS will not demand immediate payment, ask for your credit card or debit card numbers over the phone, or threaten to arrest you.

Likewise, your bank won’t call and ask for your account information. And a legitimate computer company isn’t going to call because they are getting messages from your computer about a technical problem. There are many variations, but a few basic principles can help you avoid scams.

Generally, NYSLRS will not call you unless we are following up on a contact from you (a phone call, email, online inquiry, form or letter). If you do get a call from us, you can use your NYSLRS ID to identify yourself. If you suspect someone is posing as a Retirement System representative, please notify us using our secure email form at www.emailNYSLRS.com.

Ways to protect yourself and spot scammers:

  • Be wary. Sounds too good to be true? It is. If you didn’t enter the sweepstakes, you’re not going to win it.
  • Don’t provide your Social Security number, bank account information or other sensitive personal data to anyone you don’t know.
  • Sleep on it. If the caller is legit, they won’t mind you taking time to think it over.
  • Hang Up. Don’t engage with suspicious callers. They may be able to extract valuable information from innocuous comments. (And never answer with the word “yes.” They can record you and use it in a scam.)
  • If it’s an automated call or a number you don’t recognize, let it go to voicemail.

More Information

Public Service Recognition Week

This week we proudly celebrate the more than 600,000 members and 400,000 retirees of the New York State and Local Retirement System (NYSLRS) for their service to the people of New York State.

A Brief History of Public Service Recognition Week

Public Service Recognition Week was created in 1985 to honor the men and women who serve our nation as federal, state, county and local government employees. They dedicate their careers — and sometimes their lives — to keep others safe and provide for the common good. Their work makes life in our communities better.

Congress officially designated the first week of May as Public Service Recognition Week. This year, it is being celebrated May 6 through May 12.

The Public Servants of NYSLRS

NYSLRS is full of stories about State workers and municipal employees finding value and meaning in the work they do, especially when they help other New Yorkers. The NYSLRS members that work here in the Office of the State Comptroller (OSC) are no exception.

For example, there’s Dan Acquilano, who works in the Local Government and School Accountability division of the Comptroller’s Office. He travels across the state teaching municipalities how to manage their financial operations. His efforts have helped many municipalities and school districts manage their way out of financial distress. Or, there’s Derrick Senior, who began his career as a mental health counselor. But, for the past 13 years, he’s helped keep OSC’s technology up and running at the CIO-Service Delivery Department. And, there’s Stacy Marano. She leads a team of attorneys, investigators and forensic auditors to ensure entities receiving state money – vendors, politicians, municipalities and state agencies – don’t misuse public funds. Her work helps law enforcement develop cases and root out fraud.

These are stories you may not hear about, but their work and the efforts of thousands of other public servants help make New York State a better place to live.

Public Service week collage

View more NYSLRS proud public servants

Whether they are protecting our communities, fighting fires, clearing our roads after snowstorms or simply helping government function better, NYSLRS members deliver the critical resources and services many New Yorkers depend on. Even outside of work, many NYSLRS members and retirees give back to our state by serving their communities as volunteers and supporters of charitable causes.

Comptroller DiNapoli’s Faith in Public Service

New York State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli is the administrator of NYSLRS and trustee of the Common Retirement Fund. His public service career began when he was elected as a trustee to the Mineola Board of Education at the age of 18, making him the first 18-year-old in New York State to hold public office. Comptroller DiNapoli is understandably proud about the career path he has chosen, and he often speaks about the contributions that New York’s public employees make, not just as engaged citizens, but as individuals who bring value to the communities where they live.

PFRS Membership Milestones

The Police and Fire Retirement System (PFRS) covers more than 35,000 police officers and firefighters across New York State.

As a PFRS member, you’ll pass a series of important milestones throughout your career. Knowing and understanding these milestones will help you better plan for your financial future.

Some milestones are common to most Police and Fire members; others are shared by members in a particular tier. For example, Tier 2 and 3 members must have five years of service credit to be vested (eligible for a pension benefit), while Tier 5 and 6 members need 10 years.

This graph shows common PFRS milestones:

Most PFRS members are in special plans that allow them to retire with full benefits, regardless of age, after 20 or 25 years of service. Your specific milestones, along with your pension calculation, are determined by your retirement plan, so it is important for you to familiarize yourself with the details of your own plan. You can find plan information on our Publications page. Not sure which one is yours? Your retirement plan is listed on your Member Annual Statement, which is provided to you each summer, or you can ask your employer.