Tag Archives: New Members

Earning NYSLRS Service Credit as a School Employee

In an earlier post, we talked about how full-time and part-time service credit works for NYSLRS members. We mentioned how earning NYSLRS service credit for workers in an educational setting can be a little different.
There are non-teachers earning NYSLRS service credit.

While most New York teachers and administrators are in the New York State Teacher’s retirement system, other school employees are members of the New York State and Local Retirement System (NYSLRS). In fact, 1 out of 5 NYSLRS members works for a school district. Most work according to the school year, which could be only 10 or 11 months long. So how do we determine service credit for them?

Earning NYSLRS Service Credit When You Work Full-Time

If you’re a school employee who works full-time, you receive one year of service per school year. Generally, a full-time 10-month school year requires at least 180 days worked in any school year. Depending on your employer, a full academic year can range from 170 to 200 days.

Earning NYSLRS Service Credit When You Work Part-Time

Part-time school employees earn service credit based on the number of days they work. The number of hours in a full-time day is set by your employer (it’s between six and eight hours). If you don’t work full-time, your employer converts the number of hours you worked into the equivalent number of full-time days. Your employer reports that number to us, and your days worked are plugged into the formulas below.

Regardless of whether you work full- or part-time, depending on the length of your school year, your service is credited in the following ways:

For all BOCES and school district employees, as well as
teachers working at New York State schools for the deaf and blind

Number of days works ÷ 180 days

For college employees

Number of days worked ÷ 170 days

For institutional teachers

Number of days worked ÷ 200 days

Infographic showing how to calculate part-time service credit for school employees

Check Your Member Annual Statement

Your Member Annual Statement is provided to you every summer. For most members, your statement will show how much service credit you’ve earned for the past fiscal year (April 1, 2017 – March 31, 2018). It will also show your total service credit as of March 31, 2018. Make sure to look it over to see how much service credit you’ve earned over your career. You can also check your Retirement Online account to find your service credit totals.

For more information on service credit, read our booklet, Service Credit for Tiers 2 through 6 (VO1854), or your own retirement plan publication.

Dual Membership in NYSLRS

The New York State and Local Retirement System (NYSLRS) consists of two retirement systems: the Employees’ Retirement System (ERS) and the Police and Fire Retirement System (PFRS). Your job title determines what system you’re in. In some cases, however, it’s possible to have a dual membership, to be a member of both systems. As of State fiscal year end 2018, 1,574 members had memberships in both ERS and PFRS.

How Does Dual Membership Work?

dual membership in NYSLRSLet’s say you work as a fire fighter, so you’re a member of PFRS. You decide to take on a part-time job as a bus driver for your local school district. Your school district participates in ERS, so you’re eligible for ERS membership. You fill out the membership application, and now you’re a member of both ERS and PFRS. The date you join each system determines your tier in each membership.

Implications of Dual Membership

As a member of both systems, you’d have separate membership accounts. Let’s look again at our fire-fighting bus driver example. While working as a fire fighter, you make any required contributions and earn service credit toward your PFRS pension only. The same is true for your work as a bus driver—your required contributions and earned service credit only go toward your ERS pension, not your PFRS pension.

There are other implications to dual membership. Assuming you’re vested in both memberships and meet the service credit and age requirements, you could retire and collect a pension from both systems. You’d need to file separate retirement applications for ERS and PFRS, and we’d calculate each pension separately. We’d calculate your ERS pension using the final average salary (FAS) you earned as a bus driver and your PFRS pension using the FAS from your time as a fire fighter.

And, since you’d have both an ERS pension and a PFRS pension, you would need to choose a beneficiary for each in the event of your death.

Questions?

You’ll want to make sure to know the details of your retirement plan in each system. If you have any questions about dual membership, or to discuss your particular situation when you decide to retire, please contact us.

See You at the Fair

The Great New York State FairThe 178th Great New York State Fair opens next week and NYSLRS will be there.

The 13-day celebration of everything New York runs through Monday, September 3 (Labor Day). Our information representatives will be at the fairgrounds, as they have been for more than 20 years, to help members and retirees with their retirement planning and benefit questions. In the past, many NYSLRS members have stopped by the booth to get a benefit projection. You’ll also be also be able to pick up retirement plan brochures and forms or have a consultation with one of our information representatives.

The NYSLRS booth will be in the Center of Progress Building, building 6 on the State Fair map, near the Main Gate. Once inside, you can find us against the wall on the east side.

Find Unclaimed Funds at the State Fair

OSC’s Office of Unclaimed Funds booth will be in the same building, just across from the NYSLRS booth. An unclaimed fund is lost or forgotten money, perhaps in old bank account or insurance policy that has been turned over to the State. See if any of that money might be yours. So far this year,  State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli and the Office of Unclaimed Funds has returned more than $284 million.

Comptroller DiNapoli visits the New York State Fair

Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli greets a NYSLRS member at the Fair.

The Retired Public Employees Association (RPEA) will also have a booth in the Center of Progress Building.

Special State Fair Days

Wednesday, August 22

  • Opening Day — $1 admission

Friday, August 24

  • Pride Day — LGBT choirs, parade

Monday, August 27

  • Law Enforcement Day — Free admission for law enforcement personnel and corrections officers
  • Senior Citizen’s Day — Free admission for senior citizens (60+)

Tuesday, August 28

  • Comptroller DiNapoli Visits the Fair — He manages the $207.4 Billion State Pension Fund and is the administrator of NYSLRS. He’ll be stopping by NYSLRS’s booth during the day.
  • Fire & Rescue Day — Free admission for active and retired members of fire departments and emergency services organizations
  • Senior Citizen’s Day — Free admission for senior citizens (60+)

Wednesday, August 30

  • Women’s Day

Thursday, August 31

  • Armed Forces Day — Free admission for active duty or veterans

Note: ID required for free admissions listed above. For details, check out the complete schedule of Special Fair Days.

Transferring Your Membership

People make a lot of moves during their working lives. New towns, new jobs and, in some cases, new retirement systems.

Perhaps you were a teacher, but recently began working for New York State. Or maybe you had a job with New York City, but took a position with a municipality outside of the city. If you’ve recently joined NYSLRS and are still an active member of another public retirement system in New York State, you may be able to transfer that membership to NYSLRS.

Transferring to NYSLRS

To request a transfer to NYSLRS, contact the other system while you are still an active or vested member of that system. If you are still employed in a position covered by the other retirement system, or your membership in the other system has been terminated or withdrawn, you are not eligible to transfer.

When we receive your request to transfer from the other retirement system, we will compare your date of membership in NYSLRS with your date of membership in the other system. When the transfer is completed, your date of membership will be the earlier of the two dates. If applicable, your tier will also change.

Transferring from NYSLRS to Another Retirement System

To transfer from NYSLRS to another public pension system in New York State, you must complete and submit an Application for Transfer of Membership (RS5223).

Under certain circumstances, it may not be beneficial to transfer your membership to another retirement system. If you have any questions concerning your transfer, or if you are covered by a special plan, you should contact our Call Center toll-free at 1-866-805-0990 or 518-474-7736 in the Albany, New York area before completing the application.

Whether you are transferring in or out of NYSLRS, the transfer is effective upon receipt of your application and may be irrevocable.

You can find more information about transferring membership on our website.

How To Keep Your NYSLRS Records Up-to-date

Whether you joined NYSLRS  recently or are preparing to retire, accurate records are essential. To make sure that your records are ready when you are, it’s important to check and update your NYSLRS account details. Here’s how:

  • Sign in to Retirement Online. It’s a convenient and secure way to review your records for personal details, contact information, designated beneficiaries and more. In many cases, you can use Retirement Online to make changes instead of sending forms through the mail or calling NYSLRS.
  • Review your Member Annual Statement (MAS). Each summer, your MAS offers an overview of your retirement account. Check it over carefully to make sure your date of birth, date of membership, service credit, earnings and other details are correct.

Be sure to contact us if you find any information that’s missing or incorrect. Get in touch right away:

  • When your mailing address changes. This is especially important if you leave public service before you’re eligible for retirement. With your correct address on file, we’ll be able to keep you informed about your benefits. The fastest and easiest way to update your address is to sign in to Retirement Online and make the change, or you can send us a completed Change of Address form (RS5512), though this process will take longer.
  • When you find a date-of-birth error. If your date of birth is wrong on any paperwork that we send you, we need to know. Please send us a photocopy of documentation showing your correct date of birth (such as a copy of your birth certificate). You can attach it to an email using our secure contact form, or write to our Member and Employer Services Bureau Registration Unit at 110 State Street, 5th Floor, Albany NY 12244-0001.
  • When you change your name. You can change your name in our records by submitting a Name Change Notice form (RS5483). If a court order was necessary for your name change, you’ll need to include a copy of the order.
  • When you want to select or change your beneficiaries. Sign in to Retirement Online and click Update My Beneficiaries. Retirement Online is the fastest way to get the job done. But, you can also complete a Designation of Beneficiary form (RS5127) and send it to us.

 

Popular Blog Posts of 2017

As we wrap up another year, let’s take a look back at the most popular New York Retirement News posts of 2017.

Happy New Year — Top Posts of 2017

  1. NYSLRS – One Tier at a Time: ERS Tiers 3 & 4
    When you join the New York State and Local Retirement System (NYSLRS), you’re assigned a tier based on the date of your membership. Members of Employees’ Retirement System (ERS) Tiers 3 and 4 represent nearly two-thirds of our membership, and their retirement plans are similar. Many are nearing retirement. This blog, part of a series, is an overview of ERS Tier 3 and 4 retirement benefits.
  1. Tier 3 & 4 Members: When Is The Right Time To Retire?
    If you’re in ERS Tier 3 or 4, you can retire as early as age 55. But working a few more years could have a big impact on the amount of your pension. Here are some factors to consider before you opt for an early retirement.
  1. $15 Billion in Lost Money. Could Some Of It Be Yours? Find Out.
    Is it possible you left money in an old bank account? Maybe you lost track of a security deposit, insurance payout, stock dividend or mutual fund? Could there be a distant relative who left bonds in your name?
  1. Taxes and Your NYSLRS Retirement Benefit
    Your NYSLRS retirement benefit isn’t subject to New York State or local income taxes, but it is subject to federal income tax. Before you retire, take some time to think about how taxes could affect your retirement planning.
  1. How Much Will My Pension Be?
    For anyone thinking about retirement, one big question looms: How much money will I have to live on after I stop working? Your NYSLRS pension is a lifetime benefit. Having a good idea of what that monthly amount will be is essential to effective retirement planning. Fortunately, we offer tools to help you estimate your future pension.

Generational Attitudes about Retirement

Attitudes about retirement vary from one generation to the next.

That stands to reason. For Millennials (those born from 1979–2000), retirement is a long way off. For Generation X (born 1965–1978), retirement isn’t too far down the road, while millions of Baby Boomers (born 1946–1964) are already retired.

Generational Attitudes on RetirementA number of recent studies have tracked generational differences concerning retirement, but they also show a substantial amount of agreement among the generations. Surveys show that a majority of workers, regardless of generation, are saving for retirement. But Millennials appear to be outperforming members of the older generations on that count. They tend to start saving early and are on track to outpace Boomers and Gen Xers in building retirement nest eggs.

Concerns about Social Security are high across generations, with many fearing that it won’t be there for them when it comes time for them to retire. (That fear is reasonable, though perhaps exaggerated, based on Social Security Administration projections.)

Social Security’s troubles, plus the general decline of defined-benefit pensions, has left many feeling that they are on their own. According to one report, two-thirds of both Millennials and Gen-Xers expect their retirement savings accounts to be their primary source of income after they stop working.

The take away for NYSLRS members? The cross-generational anxiety about retirement underscore the important role that a defined-benefit retirement plan, such as your NYSLRS retirement plan, plays in securing your financial future. It also reinforces the importance of saving for retirement.

Know Your Benefits: Death Benefits

Few people like to discuss dying, but it’s important to think about how those we love will get along when we do. NYSLRS members have important considerations to keep in mind. First, depending on the pension payment option you choose, you could leave behind an ongoing pension. But, beyond that, your loved ones may also receive a death benefit.

This post is an overview of common death benefits and how your survivors should file for them. It is important to review your retirement plan booklet for specific benefit and eligibility information, and to contact us with any questions you have.

Benefits

Most members who die while they’re still working will leave their beneficiaries what’s called an ordinary death benefit. The benefit amount is usually one year of your earnings per year of service, up to a maximum of three years. Depending on your system, tier and retirement plan, other limitations apply.

Generally, to qualify, you must have at least one year of service credit, and you must die while you are on payroll, in public service. Check your plan booklet for other qualifying circumstances.

Ordinary Death Benefit Graphic

Some members who die in an on-the-job accident (not due to their own willful negligence) might leave their spouses or other survivors an accidental death benefit. If paid to a surviving spouse or dependent parent, the benefit is a lifetime pension based on 50 percent of your final average salary (less any workers’ compensation benefit). There is no minimum service credit requirement.

Depending on your system, tier and retirement plan, there may be other benefits you leave your loved ones. For example, beneficiaries of Police and Fire Retirement System (PFRS) members who died after meeting the requirements for a service retirement may receive an alternative death benefit. Most Employees’ Retirement System (ERS) members, who retire from service or within a year of leaving public employment, will leave their beneficiaries a post-retirement death benefit.

Filing

Regardless of which death benefit you leave, benefits can’t be paid until we’re notified of your death. That’s why it’s so important to talk with your family now about your benefits and how to report your death to NYSLRS. Check out our Getting Your Affairs in Order and A Guide for Survivors publication for more helpful information.

Update Your Beneficiaries

In most cases (unless beneficiaries are determined by law, as in the case of accidental death benefits), your death benefit will be paid to the beneficiaries you designated at some point in the past, so it’s important to be sure yours are up to date. Your beneficiaries are listed on your Member Annual Statement. You can also view and update your beneficiaries using Retirement Online. Just register and sign in to view your designations and submit changes.

Know Your Benefits: Leaving Public Employment

It may never come up, but, you should know what would happen with your NYSLRS membership and benefits if you ever leave public employment. Even if you no longer work for a New York public employer, you’d still be a NYSLRS member. Depending on your circumstances, that membership may come with certain benefits and responsibilities.

What Happens to My Contributions If I Leave Public Employment?

If you have less than ten years of service credit, you can end your membership and request a refund of your contributions by filing a Withdrawal Application (RS5014).

If you have not earned enough service credit to be vested (eligible for a retirement benefit) and don’t withdraw your contributions, they will continue to earn 5 percent interest for seven years. At that point, if you are still off the public payroll, by law, your membership ends automatically, and your contributions will be deposited into a non-interest-bearing account. (Your contributions are not automatically refunded.)

If you are vested, your contributions will remain on deposit with NYSLRS, and when you reach retirement age, you’ll be eligible to apply for a retirement benefit.

Leaving Public Employment

How Will Leaving Public Employment Affect My Death Benefits?

If you have at least ten years of service credit before you leave, 50 percent of your death benefit may still be payable when you die. With less than ten years of service credit, the 50 percent death benefit is only payable if you die within one year of leaving public service.

How Can I Pay Back My Outstanding Loans?

If you have an outstanding NYSLRS loan, you must still make payments directly to NYSLRS at least once every three months. You must repay your loan within five years of the date it was issued, or you will default on the loan. Defaulting on a loan may carry considerable tax consequences: You’ll need to pay ordinary income tax and possibly an additional 10 percent penalty on the taxable portion of the loan. Once you’ve left public employment, you aren’t eligible to take a NYSLRS loan.

How Can I Stay Informed About My Membership If I Leave Public Employment?

If you leave public employment, but haven’t ended your NYSLRS membership, you’ll still:

Beyond staying informed, you’ll need to keep your membership information up to date:

  • Keep your beneficiary information current, and
  • Let us know about any name or address changes (for either you or your beneficiaries).

Finally, it’s your responsibility to file an Application for Service Retirement (RS6037) when you are eligible to retire — we will not pay out a retirement benefit unless you apply for it.

For more information, read our Life Changes: What if I Leave Public Employment? (VO1800) publication.