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The Economic Power of NYSLRS Retirees

Before they leave the workforce, NYSLRS retirees build careers based — at least in part — on serving the people of New York. They are police officers, firefighters and nurses. They are the countless civil servants working each day to keep government services functioning. Their value doesn’t end with retirement. In fact, NYSLRS retirees and their pensions contribute significantly to the communities where they live.

Seventy-eight percent of NYSLRS retirees (440,943 as of March 2016) stay right here in New York. They live throughout the state — from Long Island to the North Country, from the Capital District to Western New York and down to the Southern Tier. Altogether, they’re 2.9 percent of our state’s population, but in some areas, they account for more than 5 percent of the residents.

This large population with steady sources of income has a significant and positive impact on our state and local economies. In 2015 alone, NYSLRS retirees were responsible for $11.7 billion in economic activity in New York State:

  • Property taxes. In 2015, retirees paid $1.7 billion in real property taxes. That’s 5 percent of the total collected for the entire state.
  • State and local sales taxes. NYSLRS retirees paid an estimated $550 million in state and local sales tax in 2015.
  • Job creators. Some retirees do go on to start small businesses as a second act. However, all NYSLRS retirees spend at least some of their income to the benefit of local businesses, and they are responsible for an estimated 66,100 jobs as a result.

NYSLRS Retirees Contribute infographic

Remember: 75 percent of the pension benefits that make all of this possible comes from the investment earnings of the Common Retirement Fund (CRF), not from taxpayers.

Are these statistics impressive? Yes. Surprising? They shouldn’t be. According to research from the National Institute on Retirement Security (NIRS), defined benefit pensions, like those provided by NYSLRS, are responsible for substantial economic gains throughout the U.S. — an incredible $1.2 trillion in total economic output nationwide.

Pensions give retirees a stable source of income, and, in return, retirees support our national and local economies with jobs, incomes, and tax revenue.

How NYSLRS Retirees Contribute to New York’s Economy

Public pensions play an important role in our state’s economic health. The pensions NYSLRS retirees earn flow back into their communities in the form of property and sales tax payments, and local purchases. When public retirees stay in New York, they help stimulate and grow local economies.

NYSLRS Retirees Who Call New York Home

As of March 31, 2016, there are 440,943 NYSLRS retirees and beneficiaries. Seventy-eight percent of them – 345,643 – continue to live in New York. Suffolk County is home to the largest number of NYSLRS retirees and beneficiaries. More than $1 billion in pension benefits went to the 33,290 individuals who live there. Erie County has the second largest number of benefit recipients (29,029), who received $701.5 million.

NYSLRS Retirees Contribute

The Economic Impact of NYSLRS Retirees

NYSLRS retirees are patrons of local business and services, and they pay state and local taxes. By spending their retirement income locally, they help fuel the economic engines of their communities. In fact, a study by the National Institute for Retirement Security (NIRS) found that state and local pensions in New York State supported 215,867 jobs, driving $35.3 billion in total economic output and $8.1 billion in federal, state, and local tax revenues.

New York mirrored the NIRS report’s results across the rest of America. Nationally, retiree spending of pension benefits in 2014 generated $1.2 trillion in total economic output, supporting some 7.1 million jobs across the U.S.

The NIRS report suggests that a stable and secure pension benefit that won’t run out enables retirees to pay for their basic needs like housing, food, medicine and clothing. It’s good for the economy when retirees are self-sufficient and regularly spend their pension income. They spend that money on goods and services in the local community. They purchase food, clothing, and medicine at local stores, pay housing costs, and may even make larger purchases like computer equipment or a car. These purchases combine to create a steady economic ripple effect. Retirees with inadequate 401(k) savings who might be fearful of running out of savings tend to hold back on spending. This reduced spending stunts economic growth, which already is predicted to drop by one-third as the U.S. population ages.

NYSLRS Retirees Pay Their Share of Taxes

NYSLRS retirees live throughout the different regions of New York, but they only make up 2.9 percent of the general population. In some cases, they pay a larger share of property taxes. For instance, in the Capital District, retirees make up 5 percent of the population yet they pay 8.7 percent of the property taxes, which totals $218 million. In the North Country, retirees make up 4.3 percent of the population and pay 6.8 percent of the property taxes ($55 million). 

Retirees Build a Strong New York

After a career in public service, NYSLRS retirees continue to contribute to their communities and the State. Their pensions are a sound investment in New York’s future. Public pensions don’t just benefit those who receive them, but they pay dividends to local businesses, support local communities, and create jobs. As the number of NYSLRS retirees grows, it’s likely they will continue to help build a strong New York.

Retirement Savings and Confidence Continue to Decline

A new National Institute on Retirement Security (NIRS) report reveals that the median retirement account balance has dipped to $2,500 for working age American households, down from $3,000.

NIRS researchers discovered that some 62 percent of working households age 55–64 have retirement savings less than one times their annual income, which is far below what Americans need to be self-sufficient in retirement. NIRS reported that the typical near-retirement working household only has about $14,500 in retirement savings.

Retirement-CrisisEven after counting households’ entire net worth, the report revealed that two-thirds (66 percent) of working families still fell short of conservative retirement savings targets for their age and income, based on working until age 67.

Retirement Crisis Feared By Many

Another NIRS report found that an overwhelming majority of Americans – 86 percent – believe that the nation faces a retirement crisis. Nearly 75 percent of Americans are concerned about their ability to achieve a secure retirement. Some 82 percent say a pension is worth having because it provides steady income that won’t run out, while 67 percent indicate that they would be willing to take less in salary increases in exchange for guaranteed income in retirement.

Comptroller DiNapoli’s Position On Retirement Security

New York State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli, the administrator of NYSLRS and trustee of the Common Retirement Fund, has long addressed the topic of retirement security and called it “an issue that we have to confront.” In remarks he delivered last June during a Retirement Summit at The New School’s Schwartz Center for Economic Policy, the Comptroller called attention to the “staggering” national retirement savings shortfall that’s between $7 trillion and $14 trillion.

Comptroller DiNapoli is encouraging “not just a discussion of the race to the bottom, but a broader discussion about retirement security.”