Tag Archives: retirement savings shortfall

Tackling Retirement Security for Working Americans

retirement-security

Many Americans are lacking access to employer-sponsored retirement plans.

America is facing a retirement security crisis. The shift away from defined benefit (DB) pensions in favor of defined contribution (DC) plans is considered a common cause. The number of workers with a DB plan decreased pdf-icon (PDF) from 67 percent to 43 percent between 1989 and 1998, while those with a DC plan rose from 33 to 57 percent during that same time. The lack of access to any sort of employer-sponsored retirement plan is another factor: 43.3 million American workers didn’t have access to an employer-sponsored retirement plan in 2013.

The unfortunate truth, though, is that many Americans just aren’t prepared to retire.

A State Solution to the Retirement Crisis?

A few weeks ago, we mentioned how AARP NY called for a state-sponsored retirement savings program to address this problem. According to AARP NY, Americans are 15 times less likely to open a retirement savings plan on their own compared to if their employer offered one. Even more startling, about 3.6 million New Yorkers working in the private sector don’t have access to any kind of employer-sponsored retirement plan.

At the federal level, creating a DC plan with automatic enrollment has been unsuccessful. The president recently asked the Department of Labor to clarify how states can move forward with state-sponsored plans. This could help states manage how to enroll employees into a 401(k), providing workers a chance to start saving for retirement.

Pensions: A Major Part of Retirement Security

Workers will need more than their Social Security and personal savings for a secure retirement. This is where more employer-sponsored retirement plans can help workers. About two thirds of working age Americans aren’t taking part in a retirement plan pdf-icon (PDF) . But even though DC plans are now more common than DB plans, that doesn’t mean they’re the best answer to providing steady retirement income. A DB plan provides a steady source of income for the pensioner’s lifetime. There’s no guarantee a DC plan will provide a retiree with enough or any income during retirement. If too many workers retire without an employer-sponsored plan, they could face levels of poverty in retirement.

New AARP Study Finds More Than 25% of New York Baby Boomers Aren’t Confident They’ll Ever Retire

According to the findings of a new American Association for Retired Persons (AARP) report, 27 percent of individuals who are 50 years-of-age or older and currently working in New York State are not confident they will ever be able to retire. More than half of those surveyed say their retirement will be delayed for financial reasons, and 26 percent said they do not have any access to a retirement savings plan through their employer. What’s most alarming is that out of those confident they will retire, 60 percent said they’d be likely to leave New York after retiring.

“Retirement security is eroding day by day,” said New York State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli, one of the panelists at last month’s Boomer Flight Conference sponsored by AARP and City and State in Albany. “Failure to act now will only make the problem worse for the baby boomers and the generations to follow.”

Watch more of the Comptroller’s remarks from the Boomer Flight Conference.

Boomers Help Stimulate the New York Economy

AARP reported that baby boomers retired from New York’s workforce would deliver $179 billion a year to the state’s economy. According to research done by AARP and Oxford Economics, the total economic impact of New York’s 50 and older is nearly $600 billion, supporting 53 percent of the state’s jobs and 44 percent of the state taxes. But AARP also revealed that if 60% of working boomers headed out of state, they would carry with them over $105 billion annually.

New York may still have a chance at retaining the boomer population, if improvements are made. Out of those surveyed by AARP, the following said they’d be more likely to stay in New York as they age if the following areas were improved:

  • Health (77 percent)
  • Housing (70 percent)
  • Transportation (66 percent)
  • Jobs for older residents (61 percent)

“Without a long-term strategy on retirement security,” DiNapoli continued, “we risk condemning an increasing percentage of hardworking New Yorkers and Americans to poverty in their senior years.”

2014 State of the 50+ in New York State (Full report, PDF)

Comptroller DiNapoli Addresses America’s Retirement Security Crisis

Many Americans At Risk of Retiring With a Lower Standard of Living

Depending on the household, Americans face a “staggering” national retirement savings shortfall that’s between $6.8 and $14 trillion. That was the message New York State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli delivered during a June 17 Retirement Summit at The New School’s Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis. As Comptroller DiNapoli notes in this video, retirement insecurity is among the most important and pressing social and economic challenges Americans now face.

The New York State Common Retirement Fund, now valued at $176.2 billion, is one of the best funded State retirement plans in the country. At the summit, Comptroller DiNapoli reiterated that well-funded and well-managed defined benefit plans like those of the New York State & Local Retirement System are affordable and sustainable for the long term and serve as an example of how a good pension plan can work, and not just for public employees. Americans nonetheless face what he calls a “staggering” crisis of retirement insecurity.

Retirement Statistics Tell The Story

Comptroller DiNapoli pointed out the following sobering statistics:

How to Address A Complex and Growing Problem?

According to the Comptroller, though recently proposed initiatives, such as Senator Tom Harkin’s Retirement Fund s Act and President Barack Obama’s MyRA, are encouraging, it’s unlikely that any comprehensive federal legislation is going to be passed anytime soon. Comptroller DiNapoli believes that any proposed solution to this problem, whether at the state or federal level, must include a vehicle that provides ease of enrollment, protects principal, has low cost fees and provides for some level of guaranteed income in retirement. “The one thing we can’t do,” he stressed, “is stand still.”