Tag Archives: Retirees Contribute

A Snapshot of NYSLRS Retirees

This fall, NYSLRS published our Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR), with the latest data from the State fiscal year ending March 31, 2018. It’s a publication full of details about NYSLRS members, retirees and beneficiaries, as well as information about NYSLRS investments.

In this post, let’s dive in and take a look at NYSLRS retirees and the places they call home.

NYSLRS Retirees by the Numbers

As of March 31, 2018 (the end of the State fiscal year), NYSLRS provides pension benefits to 470,596 retirees and beneficiaries.

Six hundred ninety-five of them live outside the United States, in places like England and the Philippines. However, the vast majority live here in the U.S. In fact, while 22 retirees and beneficiaries have found themselves in the Great Plains of North Dakota, and more than 37,000 now make the sunshine state of Florida home, nearly 79 percent of NYSLRS retirees and beneficiaries — some 370,329 — live right here in New York.

Where NYSLRS Retirees live in the US

NYSLRS Pensions at Work

NYSLRS retirees live in our communities, in every county of the State. Their pension money flows right back into our neighborhoods, stimulating and growing local economies. In 2017 alone, NYSLRS retirees generated $12 billion in economic activity in New York State. They pay property taxes, state and local sales taxes, and they spend money at local businesses. In fact, in 2017, spending by NYSLRS retirees and their beneficiaries was responsible for the creation of an estimated 73,000 local jobs.

An Award-Winning Publication

NYSLRS has received a Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting for the CAFR for the last 14 years. It’s a national award recognizing excellence in the preparation of state and local government financial reports.

There’s more to find out about retirees, members and NYSLRS’ investments. You can check out this year’s CAFR and CAFRs from years past on our website.

The Economic Power of NYSLRS Retirees

Before they leave the workforce, NYSLRS retirees build careers based — at least in part — on serving the people of New York. They are police officers, firefighters and nurses. They are the countless civil servants working each day to keep government services functioning. Their contributions don’t end with retirement. In fact, NYSLRS retirees and their pensions contribute significantly to the communities where they live.

Seventy-eight percent of NYSLRS retirees and their beneficiaries (355,028 as of March 2017) stay right here in New York. They live throughout the state — from Long Island to the North Country, from the Capital District to Western New York and down to the Southern Tier. Altogether, they’re 1.8 percent of our state’s population, but in some areas, they account for more than 5 percent of the residents.

NYSRLS Retirees contribute a lot of money to New York State

Retirees’ contribute in New York State

This large population with steady sources of income has a significant and positive impact on our state and local economies. In 2016 alone, NYSLRS retirees were responsible for $11.8 billion in economic activity in New York State:

  • Property taxes. In 2016, retirees paid $1.7 billion in real property taxes. That’s 3.2 percent of the total collected for the entire state.
  • State and local sales taxes. NYSLRS retirees paid an estimated $618 million in state and local sales tax in 2016.
  • Job creators. Some retirees do go on to start small businesses as a second act. However, all NYSLRS retirees spend at least some of their income to the benefit of local businesses, and they are responsible for an estimated 72,370 jobs as a result.

Remember: 75 percent of the pension benefits that make all of this possible comes from the investment earnings of the Common Retirement Fund (CRF), not from taxpayers.

Retirees’ contribute nationwide

Are these statistics impressive? Yes. Surprising? They shouldn’t be. According to research from the National Institute on Retirement Security (NIRS), defined benefit pensions, like those provided by NYSLRS, are responsible for substantial economic gains throughout the U.S. — an incredible $1.2 trillion in total economic output nationwide.

Pensions give retirees a stable source of income, and, in return, retirees support our national and local economies with jobs, incomes, and tax revenue.

Where in New York are NYSLRS Retirees?

NYSLRS retirees tend to stay in New York, where their pensions are exempt from State and local income taxes. In fact, 78 percent of NYSLRS 452,455 retirees and beneficiaries lived in the State as of March 31, 2017. And half of them lived in just ten of New York’s 62 counties.

So where in New York do these retirees call home? Well, there are a lot of NYSLRS retirees and beneficiaries on Long Island. Suffolk and Nassau counties are home to more than 57,000 recipients of NYSLRS retirement benefits, with annual pension payments exceeding $1.8 billion. But that shouldn’t be surprising. Suffolk and Nassau counties are, respectively, the largest and third largest counties in the State outside of New York City.Erie County, which includes Buffalo, ranks No. 2 in the number of NYSLRS retirees, with nearly 30,000. Albany County, home to the State Capital, ranks fourth with more than 18,000. Monroe, Westchester, Onondaga, Saratoga, Dutchess and Orange counties round out the Top Ten.

This distribution is easy to understand. The Top Ten counties for retirees include nine of the ten most populous New York counties outside of New York City. (The City, which has its own retirement system for municipal employees, police and firefighters, has about 22,000 NYSLRS retirees and beneficiaries living in its five counties.)

All told, NYSLRS retirees received $5 billion in retirement benefits in the Top Ten counties, and $9.1 billion statewide.

Hamilton County had the fewest NYSLRS benefit recipients. But in this sparsely populated county in the heart of the Adirondacks, those 435 retirees represent nearly 10 percent of the county population. $8.6 million in retirement benefits were paid to NYSLRS retirees in Hamilton County during fiscal year 2016-2017.

Outside of New York, Florida remained the top choice for NYSLRS retirees, with more than 36,000 benefit recipients. North Carolina (8,693), New Jersey (7,466) and South Carolina (5,620) were also popular. There were 690 NYSLRS recipients living outside the United States as of March 31, 2017.

The Economic Power of NYSLRS Retirees

Before they leave the workforce, NYSLRS retirees build careers based — at least in part — on serving the people of New York. They are police officers, firefighters and nurses. They are the countless civil servants working each day to keep government services functioning. Their value doesn’t end with retirement. In fact, NYSLRS retirees and their pensions contribute significantly to the communities where they live.

Seventy-eight percent of NYSLRS retirees (440,943 as of March 2016) stay right here in New York. They live throughout the state — from Long Island to the North Country, from the Capital District to Western New York and down to the Southern Tier. Altogether, they’re 2.9 percent of our state’s population, but in some areas, they account for more than 5 percent of the residents.

This large population with steady sources of income has a significant and positive impact on our state and local economies. In 2015 alone, NYSLRS retirees were responsible for $11.7 billion in economic activity in New York State:

  • Property taxes. In 2015, retirees paid $1.7 billion in real property taxes. That’s 5 percent of the total collected for the entire state.
  • State and local sales taxes. NYSLRS retirees paid an estimated $550 million in state and local sales tax in 2015.
  • Job creators. Some retirees do go on to start small businesses as a second act. However, all NYSLRS retirees spend at least some of their income to the benefit of local businesses, and they are responsible for an estimated 66,100 jobs as a result.

NYSLRS Retirees Contribute infographic

Remember: 75 percent of the pension benefits that make all of this possible comes from the investment earnings of the Common Retirement Fund (CRF), not from taxpayers.

Are these statistics impressive? Yes. Surprising? They shouldn’t be. According to research from the National Institute on Retirement Security (NIRS), defined benefit pensions, like those provided by NYSLRS, are responsible for substantial economic gains throughout the U.S. — an incredible $1.2 trillion in total economic output nationwide.

Pensions give retirees a stable source of income, and, in return, retirees support our national and local economies with jobs, incomes, and tax revenue.

How NYSLRS Retirees Contribute to New York’s Economy

Public pensions play an important role in our state’s economic health. The pensions NYSLRS retirees earn flow back into their communities in the form of property and sales tax payments, and local purchases. When public retirees stay in New York, they help stimulate and grow local economies.

NYSLRS Retirees Who Call New York Home

As of March 31, 2016, there are 440,943 NYSLRS retirees and beneficiaries. Seventy-eight percent of them – 345,643 – continue to live in New York. Suffolk County is home to the largest number of NYSLRS retirees and beneficiaries. More than $1 billion in pension benefits went to the 33,290 individuals who live there. Erie County has the second largest number of benefit recipients (29,029), who received $701.5 million.

NYSLRS Retirees Contribute

The Economic Impact of NYSLRS Retirees

NYSLRS retirees are patrons of local business and services, and they pay state and local taxes. By spending their retirement income locally, they help fuel the economic engines of their communities. In fact, a study by the National Institute for Retirement Security (NIRS) found that state and local pensions in New York State supported 215,867 jobs, driving $35.3 billion in total economic output and $8.1 billion in federal, state, and local tax revenues.

New York mirrored the NIRS report’s results across the rest of America. Nationally, retiree spending of pension benefits in 2014 generated $1.2 trillion in total economic output, supporting some 7.1 million jobs across the U.S.

The NIRS report suggests that a stable and secure pension benefit that won’t run out enables retirees to pay for their basic needs like housing, food, medicine and clothing. It’s good for the economy when retirees are self-sufficient and regularly spend their pension income. They spend that money on goods and services in the local community. They purchase food, clothing, and medicine at local stores, pay housing costs, and may even make larger purchases like computer equipment or a car. These purchases combine to create a steady economic ripple effect. Retirees with inadequate 401(k) savings who might be fearful of running out of savings tend to hold back on spending. This reduced spending stunts economic growth, which already is predicted to drop by one-third as the U.S. population ages.

NYSLRS Retirees Pay Their Share of Taxes

NYSLRS retirees live throughout the different regions of New York, but they only make up 2.9 percent of the general population. In some cases, they pay a larger share of property taxes. For instance, in the Capital District, retirees make up 5 percent of the population yet they pay 8.7 percent of the property taxes, which totals $218 million. In the North Country, retirees make up 4.3 percent of the population and pay 6.8 percent of the property taxes ($55 million). 

Retirees Build a Strong New York

After a career in public service, NYSLRS retirees continue to contribute to their communities and the State. Their pensions are a sound investment in New York’s future. Public pensions don’t just benefit those who receive them, but they pay dividends to local businesses, support local communities, and create jobs. As the number of NYSLRS retirees grows, it’s likely they will continue to help build a strong New York.

NYSLRS Retirees at Home and Abroad

If you’re a current NYSLRS member, you’re a state or local employee who works within New York State. But once you retire, you can spend time in warmer climates or move closer to family.

From an economic standpoint, we’re fortunate to have 78 percent of NYSLRS retirees and beneficiaries stay in New York. As we’ve mentioned before in previous posts, NYSLRS retirees contribute to the New York economy in a big way:

  • $12 billion generated in economic activity
  • $1.6 billion paid in real property taxes
  • $514 million paid in state and local sales tax
  • 60,400 jobs created from local spending

However, we haven’t looked at the other 22 percent of our retirees and beneficiaries. If they aren’t living in New York, where have they gone?

NYSLRS Retirees in the United States

NYSLRS Retirees in US

We’d be lying if we said we were surprised that Florida is the state with the second highest number of NYSLRS retirees and beneficiaries. Florida is currently home to 35,014 NYSLRS retirees. (Keep in mind New York is home to 337,406.) And you can find many other retirees and beneficiaries all along the East Coast…

  • North Carolina: 8,190
  • New Jersey: 7,171
  • South Carolina: 5,105
  • Pennsylvania: 4,300
  • Virginia: 3,585

…the West Coast…

  • California: 2,226
  • Oregon: 284
  • Washington: 478

…and even as far as Alaska (currently 60) and Hawaii (116). All told, 429,591 NYSLRS retirees and beneficiaries live throughout the United States and its territories.

NYSLRS Retirees Around the Globe

Where in the world are NYSLRS Retirees?Out of our 430,308 total NYSLRS retirees and beneficiaries, there are only 717 globetrotters. These retirees and beneficiaries live throughout the world, with the most common countries being:

  • Canada: 164
  • Israel: 56
  • United Kingdom: 36
  • Italy: 31
  • Jamaica: 31

Whether you retire close to home or move away, you’ll always be a part of NYSLRS. Make sure you stay in the loop about your benefits by visiting our Retirees home page.

NYSLRS Retirees Help Power New York’s Economy

At the 2015 annual meeting of the Retired Public Employees Association of New York, State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli told association members that “a public pension is not only good for you and your family, it’s good for New York State.” He added that “you are part of the economic engine in many of our communities.”

The administrator of the New York State & Local Retirement System (NYSLRS) and trustee of the New York State Common Retirement Fund, State Comptroller DiNapoli also noted that, of NYSLRS’ 430,308 retirees, 78 percent of them — 337,406 — have chosen to live in New York.

NYSLRS-Retirees-Build-a-Stronger-NY

Click for full-sized version (PDF)

This is important, the State Comptroller explained, because the pension money paid to retired state and local public employees’ flows directly back into our communities, stimulating and growing our local economies.

During calendar year 2014, NYSLRS retirees were responsible for $12 billion in economic activity in New York State.

NYSLRS Retirees Build a Stronger New York

NYSLRS pension benefit can provide security and peace of mind in retirement. What some retirees might not realize about their lifetime benefit is the effect it has on the local economy. During 2014 alone, NYSLRS retirees were responsible for $12 billion in economic activity in New York State. By buying local goods and services, NYSLRS retirees help existing companies grow, create opportunities for new businesses, and help foster an environment that helps companies create job opportunities.

NYSLRS Retirees in New York

Of the 430,308 current NYSLRS retirees and beneficiaries, 78 percent of them live in New York State. These retirees make up 2.8 percent of the general population, but their impact on the State economy is considerable:

  • Retiree Spending Creates Jobs, Supports Local Business. NYSLRS retirees spend a larger than average share of their income on industries that benefitted local businesses, such as health care, restaurants and entertainment. These industries can expect more growth in the coming decades with NYSLRS retirees as part of their customer base. As a result of this spending, NYSLRS retirees were also responsible for an estimated 60,400 jobs.
  • Retirees Pay Billions in Taxes. In 2014, NYSLRS retirees paid $1.6 billion in real property taxes, which is five percent of the total collected in New York. These taxes help support New York schools, roads and government services. Also, spending by NYSLRS retirees and beneficiaries generated an estimated $514 million in state and local sales tax.

After spending their careers working in State and local governments, the university system, public authorities and schools, NYSLRS retirees continue to help New York’s Main Streets grow and develop. The benefits of a NYSLRS pension aren’t just felt by retirees, but also by local businesses and communities. As the number of NYSLRS retirees continues to grow, the investment they make in communities across New York State will also continue to grow.

Income Inequality and Pension Reform

Is the shift away from defined benefit pension plans hurting more than helping?

Today’s pension reform means increasing employee contributions, cutting pension benefits, and switching from defined benefit (DB) plans to defined contribution (DC) plans. In fact, according to a new study from the National Conference on Public Employee Retirement Systems (NCPERS), 15 million additional workers would have defined benefit plans if there had not been a trend over the past 30 years to convert pensions into defined contribution (DC) plans. However, there may be a hidden cost to this approach. As these reforms negatively affect plan participants and beneficiaries, income inequality appears to increase.

In the study, NCPERS looks at the growing debate between DB and DC plans. Those in favor of DC plans claim that DB public pension plans aren’t sustainable and taxpayers can’t afford to pay them. Others defend DB pensions, arguing the pension benefits are a type of deferred compensation and not the responsibility of taxpayers. Regardless of what side of the debate you’re on, here’s the hard reality:

  • In a DB plan, the employee receives a lifetime benefit based on years of service and salary.
  • In a DC plan, there’s no guarantee the employee will have enough or any retirement income upon retirement.

Income Inequality Worsening for Seniors

Despite the positive aspects of DB pensions, the trend against them continues, and the effects could be damaging. Several studies mentioned by NCPERS point out the reduction of retirement benefits and the shift away from DB pensions increase income inequality—even poverty—in the elderly. One study from the National Institute on Retirement Security (NIRS) found that poverty rates in senior citizen households without pensions were almost nine times higher than those with pensions.Income Inequality: The Elderly Poverty Rate is 9 times greater with no defined benefit income

The Economic Impact of NYSLRS Retirees

These are startling findings, considering the important role of pensions and retiree spending in the economy. In the US, retirees spend almost $838 billion each year, which employs millions of Americans and tens of millions indirectly. For every dollar paid in pension benefits, there’s $2.37 in economic output. In New York, retirees play an important role in the state economy. New York State and Local Retirement System (NYSLRS) retirees generate $11.3 billion in economic activity by spending $9.6 billion in the state. The pension benefits earned by NYSLRS retirees flows directly back into the local communities and economies.

As more negative changes affect DB pension plans and retiree benefits, the decrease in retiree spending will be felt throughout the economy.

“Personal income loss has a ripple effect, and everyone suffers when income inequality rises and economic growth weakens,” said NCPERS President Mel Aaronson. “Spending by retirees is vital to communities, yet local spending can easily be undermined by shortsighted changes to defined benefit pension plans.”

New York State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli, Administrator of NYSLRS and sole trustee of the Common Retirement Fund, has often said that DC plans would put more people at risk in their retirement years. During an editorial board meeting of The Syracuse Post Standard last October 20, he also maintained that switching to a defined contribution plan won’t change the state’s obligation to provide a pension to the 1 million people already in the system. “A 401(k) was never meant to be the substitute for a pension,” DiNapoli said.

New AARP Study Finds More Than 25% of New York Baby Boomers Aren’t Confident They’ll Ever Retire

According to the findings of a new American Association for Retired Persons (AARP) report, 27 percent of individuals who are 50 years-of-age or older and currently working in New York State are not confident they will ever be able to retire. More than half of those surveyed say their retirement will be delayed for financial reasons, and 26 percent said they do not have any access to a retirement savings plan through their employer. What’s most alarming is that out of those confident they will retire, 60 percent said they’d be likely to leave New York after retiring.

“Retirement security is eroding day by day,” said New York State Comptroller Thomas P. DiNapoli, one of the panelists at last month’s Boomer Flight Conference sponsored by AARP and City and State in Albany. “Failure to act now will only make the problem worse for the baby boomers and the generations to follow.”

Watch more of the Comptroller’s remarks from the Boomer Flight Conference.

Boomers Help Stimulate the New York Economy

AARP reported that baby boomers retired from New York’s workforce would deliver $179 billion a year to the state’s economy. According to research done by AARP and Oxford Economics, the total economic impact of New York’s 50 and older is nearly $600 billion, supporting 53 percent of the state’s jobs and 44 percent of the state taxes. But AARP also revealed that if 60% of working boomers headed out of state, they would carry with them over $105 billion annually.

New York may still have a chance at retaining the boomer population, if improvements are made. Out of those surveyed by AARP, the following said they’d be more likely to stay in New York as they age if the following areas were improved:

  • Health (77 percent)
  • Housing (70 percent)
  • Transportation (66 percent)
  • Jobs for older residents (61 percent)

“Without a long-term strategy on retirement security,” DiNapoli continued, “we risk condemning an increasing percentage of hardworking New Yorkers and Americans to poverty in their senior years.”

2014 State of the 50+ in New York State (Full report, PDF)